E-Prime



Downloads: E-Prime

My preferred blank experiment file. This experiment comes with pre-built facilities for counterbalancing, a generic block- and trial-structure and a couple of other features.

It also comes with two customizable logfiles (see below) to log both, sample statistics and actual data. Lovely.




E-Prime simply likes to log stuff. The typical .edat2 logfiles thus tend to be rather crowded, including all sorts of variables that you're simply not interested in. If you're not happy with this state of affairs, you might be interested in using a plain custom logfile!

Hint: Custom logfiles can also be appended to each other in runtime - goodbye good old E-Merge.




This little input/output script stores some arbitrary info (e.g., trial and block counters) and continues to use these variables when restarted.

As a side effect, this experiment also demonstrates how to read data from a text file if you want to do it manually instead of using E-Prime's standard facilites for reading lists from files.




Here it comes: A complete, manipulable virtual chess board!

Following the series of Presentation games, this script demonstrates E-Prime's astonishing capabilities as game engine. The code is still far from elegant but development has stopped for a while. For science.




Playing chess in E-Prime is only possible if one knows how to deal with mouse input . This demo script displays a button and exits as soon as the button is clicked. Nothing more, nothing less.




Computer mice are a very easy tool for studying movement trajectories in behavioral experiments. This simple trajectory experiment shows how to combine usual logfiles with breath-taking trajectory logs - ready for further analysis in Matlab.




How long did your participants press their keys? This script knows.

It works 24/7 with all commercially and non-commercially available subjects and supports hand as well as foot responses.




This little demo experiment collects keyboard input and feeds it back to the participant immediately (i.e., they can see what they are typing).